My Jalsa Memories

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by Mishal Aziz, Raynes Park, UK

As the summer term is coming to an end, many children and students are anticipating the holidays that they have planned so they can relax and regain the energy for the next school year. However, Ahmadiyya Muslim children and students have started to count the days for Jalsa Salana 2017. Every Ahmadi waits for these blessed days year after year; it is a time to get together and gain religious knowledge and develop a stronger bond among ourselves.

In my house, the Jalsa preparation started few weeks ago when me and my mum went for duty training at the mosque and my dad started visiting Hadeeqa tul Mahdi (Jalsa venue); it felt like Jalsa was just around the corner.

When I invited my friends who are not Ahmadi Muslims to Jalsa, they were quite confused as they had never heard of something like this before. I explained to them that the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community holds an annual convention over of three days in which all people get together and enhance their religious knowledge. I showed them videos of Jalsa and they were astonished to see such a number of people attending the event. They also asked me if we hired any people to help us such as in serving food, but when I told them that thousands of people volunteer to give duties, they were quite stunned.

I shared my last Jalsa memories with them. I told them that I went to the venue a day before the Jalsa starts, I participated in duty and spent quality time with all my relatives that came from different cities. During the three blessed days of Jalsa, I put extra effort into performing Tahujjud Prayer (a voluntary Prayer offered in the night), tried to be extra nice and kind to everyone and listened to and followed the beautiful guidance given by the Khalifa (fifth successor of Promised Messiah).

My most special memory from last Jalsa was when I was standing on duty and His Holiness, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the head of worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community passed just behind me. That feeling is something that will stay with me forever; just the feeling that he was few steps away from me was the best part of my whole Jalsa memories. I still remember, I was shivering with delight and I had tears in my eyes and the most beautiful and satisfactory smile that I could ever have.

My favourite part of Jalsa is when we do Bai’at (Pledge of Allegiance) on the 3rd day, at the hand of the Khalifa. Such a large number of people connected physically and emotionally is not a sight that you see every day; you feel special that you are connected to such a blessed community. That few minutes are something that I always look forward to every year because they give me a chance to seek forgiveness of Allah and become a better person.

After relishing the memories through this article, I am quite excited and looking forward to this Jalsa.

Jalsa Salana Mubarak!

Ramadhan and Me

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Mishal Aziz, Raynes Park

Ramadhan comes and goes every year and by the time we are fully able to welcome this precious month, it is time to say goodbye to it with the hope that we would be able to see it next year. As an Ahmadi Muslim girl, Ramadhan holds a very special place in my life. It gives me an opportunity to create a stronger bond with Allah, the Almighty. It gives me an opportunity to pray more optional Prayers, early in the morning and late at night, and recite the Holy Qur’an much more than I do in ordinary days.

I am a student and I fast during my college hours, like many other Ahmadi Muslim girls. My friends find it really hard to connect with me on this aspect, that how not eating or drinking gives a person more happiness and satisfaction. They often ask me “Are you forced to fast?”

My reply is always ‘No’ because in Islam you are not forced to do anything, Allah has commanded you to do certain things but He has given you free will as well so it is an individual choice to follow the commandments, to gain blessings, or go on the opposite path.

As I am studying Education and the number of children who come fasting to school make the educators assume that Muslim children have an obligation to fast from an early age however that is not true, children themselves want to fast and nowhere according to my knowledge does it say that children should be forced to fast. I remember when I was young I used to wait impatiently for Ramadhan but my mum would not let me fast because I was too young however when I turned 14, my mum gave me permission to fast over the weekend; the happiness I felt on that day was out of the world because I felt like I had accomplished something big in my life.

Another friend asked me “you claim that Allah loves you, what kind of love is that when He is asking you to starve?” I believe that Allah does not want us to merely abstain from food or drink because what benefit will He get from making us hungry and thirsty; He wants our spiritual status to improve so He wants us to refrain from falsehood, fights, wrong doings, back-biting, illegal activities, etc. I can focus on refraining from these activities while I am fasting because the hunger and thirst is a constant reminder for me that I am fasting and I have to carry out right actions.

Islam is a very considerate religion. It always has an easier way for the people who are vulnerable or caught in a situation. In the Holy Qur’an Allah says:

 “…. whoso among you is sick or on a journey, shall fast the same number of other days; and for those who are able to fast only with great difficulty, is an expiation – the feeding of a poor man….” (2:185)

This verse shows that Allah is OmniBenevolent and He cares for all His beings, He knows that some people are not able to fast because of their health, He does not force them to fast but shows an easier way which is feeding a poor person.

Every year I try to start a new good habit that I can continue even after Ramadhan. This year my goal is to start reading the translation of the Holy Qur’an so I can learn more about my religion and scale spiritual heights. (InshAllah)

May Allah shower lots of blessings in the Holy month of Ramadhan.

Ramadhan Mubarak to everyone!

New Year Reflections

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Nazma Raichuri, Hounslow East

New Year’s Eve is always a display of global celebrations, with fireworks and other jubilations in many countries. Families and friends get together rounding up the year to celebrate the new hope and new dreams that the coming year will bring.

It is also another excuse for some to indulge in hedonistic and at times disruptive merry-making. But to true believers of Allah, it provides another opportunity to show gratitude for all they have received, which is what Ahmadi Muslims aim to achieve. Many Ahmadi Muslims across the world resolve through a day of fasting and all-night praying to begin the New Year by becoming more sincere in their devotion and more eager to renew their spirituality and their connection to God.

The beginning of each year reminds us that we are here only for a limited time and this should be a time for honest self-evaluation and setting personal goals. Whether, these are physical, emotional or spiritual. Prayer is a powerful weapon, so one must use this earnestly and abundantly to seek help and courage from Allah to achieve one’s goals.

The New Year will truly be happy, if we create within us the desire and effort to better ourselves through kindness, through wisdom, through generosity, and pray to seek Allah’s blessing and help for us all. Ameen.